Generic C / Python Polyglot

A polyglot — coming from the Greek words πολύς (many) and γλώττα (tongue) — is a piece of source code which can run in multiple languages, often performing language-dependent tasks.
Even though such a source code’s feature may not seem particularily useful or possible with certain language combinations, trying to bend not one but multiple language’s syntactic rules and overall behavior is still interesting.

An example of a rather simple polyglot would be a Python 2 / Python 3 polyglot — if one counts those as two separate languages. Because of their enormous similarities, one can pick out differences and use those to determine which language runs the source code.

if 1/2>0:print("Python 3")
else:print("Python 2")

Utilizing Python’s version difference regarding integer division and real division is one of the most common ways to tell them apart, as it can also be used to only control a specific part of a program instead of having to write two nearly identical programs (increases the program’s style and cuts on bytes — an important consideration if one golfs a polyglot).

However, polyglots combining languages that are not as similar as Python 2 and Python 3 require more effort. The following is a general Python 2 / C polyglot, meaning that nearly all C and Python 2 programs can be mixed using this template (there are a few rules both languages need to abide which will come apparent later).

#define _\
"""
main(){printf("C");}
#define _"""
#define/*
print"Python 2"
#*/_f

In the above code, main(){printf("C");} can be nearly any C code and print"Python 2" can be nearly any Python 2 code.
Language determination is exclusively done via syntax. A C compiler sees a #define statement and a line continuation \, another two #define statements with a block comment in between and actual compilable C source code (view first emphasis).
Python, on the other hand, treats all octothorps, #, as comments, ignoring the line continuation, and triple-quoted strings, """...""", as strings rather than statements and thus only sees the Python code (view second emphasis).

My first ever polyglot used this exact syntactical language differentiation and solved a task titled Life and Death of Trees (link to my answer).

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TImg

Texas Instrument’s TI-84 Plus is a graphing calculator with a variety of features. It has built-in support for both fractions and complex numbers, can differentiate and integrate given functions and supports programming capabilities. The latter allows to directly manipulate the calculator’s monochrome display’s 5985 pixels (the screen has dimensions 95x63). TImg is a Python program (source code is listed below and can also be downloaded) which takes in an image and outputs TI-BASIC source code which, when run on the graphing calculator, will produce the given image — in potentially lower quality.

TImg
TI-84 Plus’ screen dimensions (bitmap).

PIL — the Python Imaging Library — is used to read in the image and further for processing. The supplied image may be rotated and resized to better fit the TI-84’s screen and any color or even grayscale information is reduced to an actual bitmap — every pixel only has two distinct values.
Direct pixel manipulation on the TI-84 is done via the Graph screen. To get remove any pixels the system draws on its own, the first three commands are ClrDraw, GridOff and AxesOff which should result in a completely blank screen — assuming that no functions are currently being drawn. All subsequent commands are in charge of drawing the previously computed bitmap. To turn certain pixels on, Pxl-On(Y,X is used where Y and X are the pixel’s coordinates.

fractal
A fractal (bitmap).

Since the TI-84 Plus only has 24 kilobytes of available RAM, the source code for a program which would turn on every single pixel individually does not fit. Luckily, though, a program which only individually turns on half of the screen’s pixels fits. To ensure that TImg’s output fits on the hardware it is designed to be used with, an image’s bitmap is inverted when the required code would otherwise exceed 3500 lines — a value slightly above the required code to draw half of the pixels.

jblog
A J-Blog screenshot (bitmap).

By default, the resulting code draws pixels starting at the screen’s top-left corner and ending at its bottom-right. A command line flag --shuffle can be set which changes this behavior to let pixels pseudo-randomly appear on the screen (pseudo-randomness is calculated in the Python script; the TI-BASIC source code is completely deterministic).
And — of course — one can feed the program an image of the calculator the BASIC code runs on; self-referential TIception.

tiception
TIception (input image).

# Python 2.7 code; Jonathan Frech; 5th, 6th of October 2017

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Rainbowify

To digitally represent colors, one most often uses the RGB color system. By combining three fundamental light colors in certain ways, one can define a variety of different wavelengths of light. The human eye has three distinct photoreceptors for the aforementioned three colors, nearly all screens use pixels consisting of three parts in those colors and most image formats store the image data in the RGB color system.

Honey bee
Honey bee (original)

However, there are other color systems than RGB with other strengths. Cycling through the colors of the rainbow, for example, is a lot easier using the HSL (or HSV) color model, as it is simply controlled by the hue.

Fruit
Fruit (original)

Rainbowify uses the HSL color model to rainbowify a given image. To do so, the image is first converted into a grayscale image (averaging all three color channels). A pixel’s brightness is then interpreted as its hue with its saturation and lightness set to the maximum. As a final touch, the hue gets offset by a pixel-position dependent amount to create the overall appearance of a rainbow.
Source code is listed below and can also be downloaded.

Sunflower
Sunflower (original)
Thistle
Thistle (original)
# Jonathan Frech; 13th of August, 22nd of September 2017

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