TImg

Texas Instrument’s TI-84 Plus is a graphing calculator with a variety of features. It has built-in support for both fractions and complex numbers, can differentiate and integrate given functions and supports programming capabilities. The latter allows to directly manipulate the calculator’s monochrome display’s 5985 pixels (the screen has dimensions 95x63). TImg is a Python program (source code is listed below and can also be downloaded) which takes in an image and outputs TI-BASIC source code which, when run on the graphing calculator, will produce the given image — in potentially lower quality.

TImg
TI-84 Plus’ screen dimensions (bitmap).

PIL — the Python Imaging Library — is used to read in the image and further for processing. The supplied image may be rotated and resized to better fit the TI-84’s screen and any color or even grayscale information is reduced to an actual bitmap — every pixel only has two distinct values.
Direct pixel manipulation on the TI-84 is done via the Graph screen. To get remove any pixels the system draws on its own, the first three commands are ClrDraw, GridOff and AxesOff which should result in a completely blank screen — assuming that no functions are currently being drawn. All subsequent commands are in charge of drawing the previously computed bitmap. To turn certain pixels on, Pxl-On(Y,X is used where Y and X are the pixel’s coordinates.

fractal
A fractal (bitmap).

Since the TI-84 Plus only has 24 kilobytes of available RAM, the source code for a program which would turn on every single pixel individually does not fit. Luckily, though, a program which only individually turns on half of the screen’s pixels fits. To ensure that TImg’s output fits on the hardware it is designed to be used with, an image’s bitmap is inverted when the required code would otherwise exceed 3500 lines — a value slightly above the required code to draw half of the pixels.

jblog
A J-Blog screenshot (bitmap).

By default, the resulting code draws pixels starting at the screen’s top-left corner and ending at its bottom-right. A command line flag --shuffle can be set which changes this behavior to let pixels pseudo-randomly appear on the screen (pseudo-randomness is calculated in the Python script; the TI-BASIC source code is completely deterministic).
And — of course — one can feed the program an image of the calculator the BASIC code runs on; self-referential TIception.

tiception
TIception (input image).

# Python 2.7 code; Jonathan Frech; 5th, 6th of October 2017

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Rainbowify

To digitally represent colors, one most often uses the RGB color system. By combining three fundamental light colors in certain ways, one can define a variety of different wavelengths of light. The human eye has three distinct photoreceptors for the aforementioned three colors, nearly all screens use pixels consisting of three parts in those colors and most image formats store the image data in the RGB color system.

Honey bee
Honey bee (original)

However, there are other color systems than RGB with other strengths. Cycling through the colors of the rainbow, for example, is a lot easier using the HSL (or HSV) color model, as it is simply controlled by the hue.

Fruit
Fruit (original)

Rainbowify uses the HSL color model to rainbowify a given image. To do so, the image is first converted into a grayscale image (averaging all three color channels). A pixel’s brightness is then interpreted as its hue with its saturation and lightness set to the maximum. As a final touch, the hue gets offset by a pixel-position dependent amount to create the overall appearance of a rainbow.
Source code is listed below and can also be downloaded.

Sunflower
Sunflower (original)
Thistle
Thistle (original)
# Jonathan Frech; 13th of August, 22nd of September 2017

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Arithmetic Golfing

A recent PCG golfing question When do I get my sandwich? asked to find a mapping between seven input strings (sandwich names) and the seven days of the week (indexed by number).

The first answer was made by a user named i cri everytim and utilized a string of characters which uniquely appear at the same position in all seven input strings, enklact, to perform the mapping in Python 2 requiring 29 bytes. After their answer, a lot of answers appeared using the same magic string in different languages to reduce the number of bytes needed. Yet nobody reduced the byte count in Python.

Trying to solve the problem on my own, my first attempt was using only the input strings’ last decimal digit to perform the mapping, though this approach did not save on bytes (read my PCG answer for more on this 30 byte solution).

After a few more hours of working on this problem, however, I achieved to bring down the byte count by one entire byte.

I did so by using a simple brute-force algorithm to check for Python expressions which can be used to perform the sought after mapping. To do so, I use Python’s apostrophes (`...`) to turn the found expression into a string — str(...) is three whole bytes longer — and index that string with the input strings’ lengths. It sure is not very readable, but only takes 28 bytes — and that is all that matters.

lambda S:`6793**164`[len(S)]

After finding the 28 byte function which uses a 9 byte expression (6793**164), I attempted to find an even shorter expression. And even though I did not yet find one, I did write a more general brute-force Python program (source code shown below; can also be downloaded) than the one I linked to in my PCG answer.

Brute-forcing takes exponentially more time the more digits you have to check, so my brute-forcer still requires the user to decide for themselves which expressions should be tried.
There are three parameters that define the search; a regex pattern that should be contained in the expression’s string, an offset that pattern should ideally have and a target length. If an expression is found that takes as many bytes as or less bytes than the target length, an exclamation point is printed.
Though this program did not prove useful in this case, there may come another challenge where an arithmetic expression golfer could come in handy.

My program may not have found shorter expressions, but definitely some impressive ones (the +... at the end refers to an additional offset from the string index which — unsurprisingly — take additional bytes):

  • 2**2**24+800415
  • 2**2**27+5226528
  • 2**7**9+11719750
  • 7954<<850

I also considered using division to generate long strings of digits which may match; the only problem is that Python floating-point numbers only have a certain precision which does not produce long enough strings. Again, using exponentiation (**) and bitshifting (<<) I could not come up with a working expression that takes less bytes.


# Python 2.7 code; 7th, 8th of September 2017

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